Naturists Campaigning for Naturism

acceptance by textiles

Photo 2015

There is still time to enter Photo 2015.

There is a fantastic prize for the winner, a one-week holiday for two either in Canada, Greece or Thailand. The choice is yours. All you have to do send us your pictures that best describe Living Naturism.

There is a fee, £6 Sterling for three pictures and a further £2.50 for every additional picture above that, with all proceeds goes to Naturist Action Group in the UK.

More information with competition rules, entry form and model release forms can be found on our web page.

Closing date for entries is 25th September 2015.

Please share.

Come on Sara

If you’re at work, you almost certainly missed this but the new head of the National Police Chiefs’ Council told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire that the public should not expect to see an officer after their home gets burgled.

The interview with Sara Thornton, who took up her new post as the head on the NCCP in April when it took over from ACPO, has been widely reported, including The Times, but as that paper has a pay wall I’ve included a link as to how the BBC itself reported the interview.

Essentially, with budget cuts and fewer officers, the police have to prioritise with sexual offences, concerns over terrorism and cyber crime being given a higher priority than car crime or burglary.

In response to The Times article, colleague Duncan Heenan dashed off a letter the same day:

Dear Sir,

Police Responses,

If Sara Thornton (Times 29/7/15) does not want the police to waste their time responding to unimportant matters, she needs to start by pointing them at the CPS Guideline on handling incidents involving Naturism, which points out that, unless some criminal act is involved, non-sexual nudity in public is not illegal. This message has still not been understood by most front line officers, who will rush around at the mention of a peacefully naked person as if a murder was in progress.

Yours faithfully,

Open spaces in London

OPEN SPACES in London jul15

A new update item on looking for open spaces suitable for naturism in London has been added. With the discussion on a Greater London National City Park we are now extending the search to cover all of Greater London, with details of how you may be able to help in the new item.

I will be the NAG co-ordinator on this and I have 40 years experience in community development. This will help to support volunteers.

John Paine

Good Parenting

The Brighton leg for the WNBR caused a bit more of a stir than usual this year, as it was alleged that a girl – thought to be eight or nine years old – took part, naked.

Chris Holmes, who complained about it to The Argus, said: ‘The fact there was an eight or nine-year old girl on her bike completely naked shocked me beyond words.’ The quote continued: ‘I spoke to the organisers, who seemed to think this was fine.’

While on the other hand, Sarah Bush was quoted as saying the: ‘ones in the wrong aren’t the parents or organisers but anyone picturing [the child] for unhealthy reasons. Let the kids enjoy their innocence while they can.’

Co-organiser for the Brighton WNBR, Duncan Blinkhorn told The Argus that the ride was about being body-positive and that applies to children as much as adults, adding ‘Why can’t children be naked if adults are naked?’

And that’s the point; WNBR is a protest where nudity is used to show the vulnerability of bike riders and to gain publicity. The adult would be saying ‘do as I say, not as I do’, if they were naked but banned the child from doing the same.

As a society, we do seem to have this odd reaction to when it comes to children. We tend to over empathise with the child and by doing so we project our own feelings and fears on to them, for the child’s sake. In an article on a different topic for The Telegraph, Rowan Pelling wrote: ‘A few years ago, when my children were young enough to enjoy the local paddling pool, other parents would frown when I let them run around naked, obsessed as the world is with the notion paedophiles are tracking your offspring’s every move.’

That is so true. We are obsessed with the perceived dangers that lurk in our streets. Whatever happened to the advice ‘Don’t talk to strangers’? Whatever happened to the old maxim ‘A little bit of dirt in your diet does you good’? That should not be taken literally of course, but a child must be allowed to take controlled risks in order to learn from them.

What that child has learned by taking part in the WNBR is what it is like to be naked in a public setting. Next year, she may still choose to participate but not naked. Or she might not participate at all, that will be her choice and an informed one from the earlier experience. We demand all kinds of information about things we are not expert in to make an informed choice. Being a good parent, in my book, means giving children the tools to make better choices in later life.

Incidentally, just as a small digression. The Brighton WNBR is a marshalled event so police officers were in attendance and could have intervened at any point, if they thought the child was in any danger. A Sussex Police spokesperson told The Argus that they had not been approached about the naked child or received any complaints. So, was The Argus guilty of sensationalising an incident that would have otherwise gone unnoticed, or was Chris Holmes just grabbing his 15-minutes of fame? I leave you to decide.

One Man’s Year As A Nudist

Auntie Beeb – an affectionate name given by a certain generation to the BBC – has published an article American writer Mark Haskell Smith who spent a year as a nudist – naturist – whatever you like to call yourself.

For an experienced naturist, Haskell Smith’s conclusion may not come as a surprise but One Man’s Year As A Nudist is an interesting read. You can also find an alternative, longer, article from the LA Weekly: Why Do People Like To Be Naked In Public, by Mindy Farabee.

This is to promote Haskell Smith’s new book: Naked At Lunch: Adventures Of A Reluctant Nudist available from Amazon.co.uk.

Cheers
Reg

Please Help Us to Campaign for You!

To make a donation to NAG, please use the Donate link at the top of this page. Alternatively, we will appreciate any donation no matter how small sent to our registered address on our Contact page.